Never a Good Time for Maintenance Training? Frank Rowe Maintenance Troubleshooting Resource Group - Case Lots of Books, Tools & Hands on Trainin...

Never a Good Time for Maintenance Training? Frank Rowe Maintenance Troubleshooting Resource Group - Case Lots of Books, Tools & Hands on Training I've heard all the reasons (first hand),  including: We’re short handed They already know it They won’t practice what they learn We’re so busy we can’t spare anyone It’s vacation time Business is down & purse strings have to be tightened The last training we sent them to was a waste They’ll fall asleep in a classroom setting Our reliability is OK We’re making money They could end up knowing more than I (their manager) knows Production will never let us implement what we learn We don’t have the tools & they’re too expensive And the list goes on & on Now for the Compelling Reasons to do it   ( It’s simple & can be wrapped up in a single thought ) - To achieve world class maintenance where most jobs are planned and the MTBF is in the world class range, adequate time & resources have to be allotted to do the job right including the key element of craftsmen/women having the skill set(s) to do the job correctly, enabled by effective TRAINING Sometimes the training is in the form of a refresher and other times it is new material. Either way, not only does the craftsman/woman benefit, so does your organization. Believe me, I know it because I’ve been there & done that! There is a clear difference between getting the plant back up & running after a breakdown & scheduled maintenance or replacement. Often during a breakdown, the rules are “suspended” and the principal task is to get back on line, although there are occasions when adding 10-15% additional time is acceptable if it means not suspending the quality installation or repair standards. The keys to making all of this work are: Getting buy in from upper management Getting ownership of the program from not only the maintenance staff but also the production folks Having the right tools, store room & parts, planning & TRAINING That’s where the Maintenance Troubleshooting Resource Group comes in. At our State of the Art Hands on Training Center, we combine over 150 years of hands on maintenance experience with class room training combined with working on both models as well as full size industrial/commercial fans/blowers/pumps & motors. We average over 45% “Hands on Time” during our sessions and it works!!  Actually doing the work after a classroom session allows the attendees to practice what they’ve just learned and learn from their mistakes right then & there. Not only do the instructors help, the students help each other more than you might expect. We’re the only place like this in the region & classes are filling up fast. The model that is working the best is to lay out a plan for a maintenance crew that involves several different courses spread out over a few months. Follow that up the next year with a few more or maybe a refresher or two. It works – you can ask our friends at FMC where we just finished up the first phase of training or talk to some of the maintenance staff at A. I. DuPont Hospital, Lockheed Martin, Calpine, Bay Health, The Pentagon, Alexandria Renew Enterprises or Bristol-Myers Squibb just to name a few more. Take a look at our standard course offerings at www.mtroubleshooting.com under the Hands on Training Category. There is a comprehensive one page outline for each course as well as information on our facilities & trainers or give us a call at 302-738-0532 (ask for Frank) or 302-690-0871 (ask for Tom) and we’ll gladly answer your questions. Want to take a tour of the facility – again just give us a call & we’ll make it happen.